USD Law to Host Title IX Panel

Every university receiving federal funds is governed by Title IX, but very few students are able to articulate the policies and procedures regarding violations. In fact, many students believe Title IX to only effect athletics. In reality, the law applies to every single aspect of education, including course offerings, counseling and counseling materials, financial assistance, student health and insurance benefits and/or other services, housing, marital and parental status of students, physical education and athletics, education programs and activities, and employment.

What does a Title IX violation hearing look like? Can I bring an attorney to such a hearing? As an attorney, are your clients afforded all of the Due Process Rights as at similar hearings? Join us for a panel discussion to answer those questions and more surrounding Title IX.

  • WHEN: Monday, April 10th, 2017 5-7 P.M.
  • WHERE: USD School of Law Courtroom

FEATURING:

  • Michelle Johnson, Ed.D., SDSU Title IX/EO Coordinator
  • David Herbster, Director of the USD Department of Athletics
  • Deborah Dodge, Director of USD Student Rights & Responsibilities

 Sponsored by Women In Law, Sports Law, BLSA, and OUTLaws

 Refreshments and a Taco Bar will be served after the panel.

*If you are a person with a disability and need a special accommodation to fully participate, please contact Disability Services at least 48 hours prior to the event at 605-677-6389.

Title IX Panel Poster

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Professor of Law Myanna Dellinger Completes Fulbright Specialist Grant

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Associate Professor of Law Myanna Dellinger

USD School of Law Associate Professor of Law Myanna Dellinger has now completed her Fulbright Scholarship with the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), a renowned think-tank in Potsdam, Berlin (http://www.iass-potsdam.de/). Professor Dellinger gave presentations on the expected climate change and energy policies under the Trump administration. These presentations were attended by institute researchers as well as employees from the United States Embassy in Berlin. Professor Dellinger also conducted research for her future scholarly agenda on issues that lie at the intersection between international environmental law and business. Further, she interviewed several researchers for the Global Energy and Environmental Law Podcast; a co-production of the USD School of Law and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

USD Law Again Named to Top 20 Best Value Law Schools

The University of South Dakota School of Law is again listedcoverfall16 among the Top 20 Best Value Law Schools by Prelaw Magazine this year coming in at 13th among over 200 accredited law schools in the U.S. Previously, USD School of Law has ranked as high as 10th Best Value (2015).

The purpose of PreLaw Magazine’s Best Value Schools is to identify law schools where graduates have excellent changes of passing the bar and getting a legal job without taking on a ton of debt.The formula for calculating the Best Value Schools takes the percentage of graduates who pass the bar exam (15%), employment rate (35%), tuition (25%), cost of living (10%), and average indebtedness upon graduation (15%).

Based on the methodology, USD School of Law ranks high due to inexpensive tuition and high employment rate; annual SD resident tuition was the second lowest of the Top 20, and held employment rates consistent with the top ranked schools.

Law School Dean Tom Geu credits strong demand for USD Law’s graduates as the biggest contributing factor to this year’s ranking. “All of legal education is in a state of flux and we are no exception”, said Geu, “but the more we change to meet current challenges; the more we hope to remain the same by continuing to provide exceptional lawyers, leaders, and business entrepreneurs to South Dakota and the region.”

Professor of Law Pommersheim Receives Humanities Award

University of South Dakota Professor of Law Frank Pommersheim recently received the Distinguished Achievement for the Humanities award from the South Dakota Humanities Council. The award is in recognition of scholarship in the field of advocacy for the humanities and civic engagement. He was one of four recognized at the South Dakota Festival of Books Sponsored by the South Dakota Humanities Council.

Honorees of the award demonstrate a commitment to communicate humanities-related events and programs, write books and publications important to the humanities, and provide funding or partnerships to sustain a vibrant cultural landscape. Pommersheim fits all three categories.

Pommersheim is one of the few people in the state known for leading community-wide discussions regarding tribal relations; he has been tapped by the Humanities Council in prior years to present on the topics of tribal sovereignty, tribal relations, and Indian relations. For example, in 2014, he spoke in both Sioux Falls and Vermillion on a reflection of Indian relations on South Dakota’s 125th Anniversary. His experiences and scholarship in Indian Law have been reflected most recently in his book, Tribal Justice: 25 Years as a Tribal Appellate Justice.

“The good thing about the Humanities Council is that it establishes avenues of communications between Indian peoples and non-Indians. There are very few forums were Indians and non-Indians come together to discuss issues; one of the predicates of any solution is engagement. When races don’t have interaction, the gap in communication grows larger and is filled by negative stereotypes.”

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Professor of Law Frank Pommersheim (second from right)

Pommersheim was also recognized for his artistic abilities in the field of poetry. Most past or present USD Law students can testify that he is renowned for starting lectures with a poem about Buddha. He has previously published chapbooks containing his poems about eastern philosophy. Those familiar with his chapbooks may have taken note of the beautiful cover art. A little know fact is that USD School of Law Registration Officer Teresa Carlislie creates the cover artwork.

The third Buddha poem chapbook is expected to be published sometime this upcoming spring. Readers consist mainly former students, friends, members of the bar, poetry enthusiasts, and people from Pommersheim’s past.

When asked where he got the inspiration for the Buddha themed poems, Pommersheim replied, “It all started when I was daydreaming about eight years ago about Buddha sending an email.” Email from Buddha was his first poem of the series. Positive feedback propelled him to continue on.

Eastern philosophy poetry, academic scholarship in Indian Law, and engaging communities wedged apart by negative stereotypes and intolerance are a few of the many reasons why Professor of Law Frank Pommersheim was awarded the Distinguished Achievement for the Humanities.

USD Law Again Named to Top 20 Best Value Law Schools

The University of South Dakota School of Law is again listedcoverfall16 among the Top 20 Best Value Law Schools by Prelaw Magazine this year coming in at 13th among over 200 accredited law schools in the U.S. Previously, USD School of Law has ranked as high as 10th Best Value (2015).

The purpose of PreLaw Magazine’s Best Value Schools is to identify law schools where graduates have excellent changes of passing the bar and getting a legal job without taking on a ton of debt.The formula for calculating the Best Value Schools takes the percentage of graduates who pass the bar exam (15%), employment rate (35%), tuition (25%), cost of living (10%), and average indebtedness upon graduation (15%).

Based on the methodology, USD School of Law ranks high due to inexpensive tuition and high employment rate; annual SD resident tuition was the second lowest of the Top 20, and held employment rates consistent with the top ranked schools.

Law School Dean Tom Geu credits strong demand for USD Law’s graduates as the biggest contributing factor to this year’s ranking. “All of legal education is in a state of flux and we are no exception”, said Geu, “but the more we change to meet current challenges; the more we hope to remain the same by continuing to provide exceptional lawyers, leaders, and business entrepreneurs to South Dakota and the region.”

Professor Horton Teaches “Deposition Skills” at Berkeley Law

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Professor of Law Thomas Horton

USD Professor of Law & Heidepriem Trial Advocacy Fellow Thomas Horton will be teaching “Deposition Skills” for the National Institute Trial Advocacy (NITA), October 14th-16th at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law (commonly referred as Berkeley Law or Boalt Hall). The purpose of NITA is to train and mentor lawyers to be competent and ethical advocates in pursuit of justice, and to develop and teach trial advocacy skills to support and promote the effective and fair administration of justice. Professor Horton regularly teaches trial and deposition skills for NITA, and additionally helped teach young South Dakota attorneys trial skills along with other members of the South Dakota Trial Lawyers Bar, as part of the South Dakota Trial Academy’s week long NITA style course at the USD School of Law this summer. For more information about the National Institute of Trial Advocacy, or how to attend one of their many skill building seminars, visit http://www.nita.org/.

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Simmons: “A Chinese Inheritance”

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Tom Simmons

Associate Professor of Law Tom Simmons has had accepted for publication an article titled A Chinese Inheritance by the editors of the Quinnipiac Probate Law Journal. The  publication is produced by the Quinnipiac University School of Law located in North Haven, Connecticut. While teaching USD law students in China the last two summers, Simmons became interested in Chinese inheritance laws and worked with a Chinese law student to translate several recently decided inheritance decisions from the Chinese courts. He notes: “The cultural values of a society are often discernible in its laws of succession and intestacy (that is, the laws which govern the distribution of a decedent’s estate when there is no valid will). The most startling characteristic of Chinese inheritance law is its willingness to invoke judicial review of an heir’s conduct in settling upon distribution shares. Chinese conduct-based intestacy is widespread and fluid.” His article contrasts American and Chinese approaches to intestacy and identifies competing policies and values.